The Shrine by L.J. Ross

It’s hard to believe that L.J. Ross has already written sixteen DCI Ryan books (and others besides), but I am so glad she has. This series is like comfort food. When you pick up the next one in the series, you know you’re in great hands. The familiar characters whom, over the years, you’ve grown to genuinely care about and will to succeed and survive appear and you settle in, knowing the recipe is being prepared by a master. This book is yet another very satisfying meal. When a colleague of Ryan and co., a high-ranking officer, is shot dead outside her home and then an explosion goes off in Durham Cathedral and a priceless relic is stolen, Ryan’s team are swiftly put into action. Ryan (for reasons I won’t reveal) is forced to bury personal feelings and simply get on with the job. But as the cases unravel, it’s clear that not only may they be related, but the killer hasn’t finished… Character driven, these books are slower-paced than many crime novels, allowing plot and certainly anything gritty to slide into the background as setting and dialogue and the bonds that connect the main characters are brought to the fore.  This is what makes them both an easy but immensely pleasurable read and I’m already looking forward to the next...

Read More...

Tags: ,

Comments: No Comments

The Octopus and I by Erin Hortle

This was an unusual book to which I had incredibly mixed reactions. I can only think of this as a positive thing – for both the reader and the author. In telling the story of Lucy, a breast cancer survivor who, while struggling to deal with her new body (never mind the trauma of cancer treatment and everything the mind, body, and those around you deal with post-recovery – I speak from experience), has a strange and incredible experience with an octopus. This has a profound impact on her life in many, many ways, changing her both internally and externally and altering the relationships she has with those closest to her, those she meets and, above all, the natural environment and the fauna that inhabit it in ways humans cannot possibly comprehend. The novel opens in one of the most original ways I’ve read in a long time and it took me a moment to become accustomed to the voice. I found it strangely beautiful and moving – particularly when I understood it was a wondrous creature narrating. This occurs at different times in the novel- creatures take over the story. I am not as convinced by the success of those other voices or the position they hold in the book as I was this first one. In many ways, they jarred a little. That said, when Lucy and the humans and their interactions take over, the story moves well and the characters are interesting and mostly engaging. There were times I really didn’t like Lucy at all. I struggled so hard with this because as a woman, cancer survivor, and someone who feels bonds with the environment (especially in Tasmania), I felt I should like her more. But, as is the case with others in the book, she...

Read More...

Tags: ,

Comments: No Comments

The Atlantis Plague by A.G. Riddle.

A.G Riddle’s books are what I would call a guilty pleasure. His Winter World series and Pandemic novels were easy-read page turners that were perfect holiday fare. The first book in this series, The Atlantis Gene was similar in that it was a fast-paced sci-fi action adventure story that was good enough for the sequel to beckon. While there were some worthy moments in this second book, especially near the beginning, I’m afraid that even for this genre, there were times it was impossible to suspend my disbelief. Not only did dead characters keep resurrecting but one of the main characters performs the equivalent of an ex machina manoeuvre, meaning that all the questions the reader and thus characters had could be (conveniently) answered as she suddenly became a font of all knowledge (because… shhhhh… she’s not who we think she is). It became a bit too much. So, while the book and characters were pitched into chaos which had folk flying, sailing, running, digging beneath the earth and making all kinds of discoveries and taking incredible risks, being transported here and there, I virtually ceased to care. My investment in the story, which became incredibly convoluted and expedient, ran its course. Not even the science was plausible or even, for that matter, interesting enough to give the wild tale credibility anymore. Don’t get me wrong, Riddle knows how to write and the short pacey chapters keep you turning the pages, even if it’s only to get to the end. Nah, that’s not entirely fair. There’s a smidgin of wanting to know left that did that. The ending prepares the reader for the third instalment. Not sure I have the...

Read More...

Tags: ,

Comments: No Comments

Nine Elms by Robert Bryndza

Robert Bryndza burst onto the crime-writing scene a few years back with his excellent Erika Foster series, which I thoroughly enjoy. It was with great excitement then that I picked up this first book in a new series, featuring police officer, Kate Marshall. Kate was a high-flying young police woman who, after sleeping with her superior, also catches a sought-after serial killer – the Nine Elms murderer. Instead of being rewarded for her efforts, she leaves the force in disgrace. The story begins fifteen years later as Kate, now a mother and a criminology lecturer, is living a quiet life by the coast, teaching keen students and interacting with her brilliant research assistant, Tristan Harper. When she’s approached by distraught parents with a missing daughter, Caitlyn, essentially a cold case that the police never took seriously but which the parents believe is connected to the Nine Elms murders, she reluctantly takes it on. In the meantime, a Nine Elms copycat killer has emerged and the body count is growing. Against her will, Kate finds herself doing private investigating with Tristan, not only to try and resolve what happened to Caitlyn, but learn what she can about this mimic killer, a killer who is getting too close to Kate and her son, Jake, for comfort. This novel opens in a strong and brutal manner (which is Bryndza’s style), grasping the reader by the collar and not letting go for a while. After this knockout beginning, the book slows a little as we’re introduced to Kate and invited to peel back the various layers that make the person she is now. Likewise, her professional and personal environment are described and explored, setting the groundwork for the character and future stories. But before long the pace builds again to breakneck speed as...

Read More...

Tags: , ,

Comments: One Comment

The Noble Path by Peter May

Having enjoyed May’s Lewis trilogy and Lockdown (which was written fifteen years ago and rushed to publication because of the pandemic) I thought I would give this one a go. Also written decades ago and then re-edited to exclude some sex scenes, it’s set in London, Thailand and Cambodia – during the reign of the terrifying Khmer Rouge and Pol Pot. While I knew this might be difficult reading in that what the poor Cambodians suffered during those bleak years is just shocking, I also have a vested interest in contemporary Cambodia. Not only do I support a school in the provinces, but have a lovely sponsored child there both of whom I visit, with like-minded friends who also have children and help this school, every year.  I’ve also been to Thailand often. I girded my loins ready for what I suspected might be a punishing read. It was, but not for the reasons I anticipated. This was such a predictable, cliched read that relied far too heavily on reductive stereotypes (gender, sexual, cultural, familial) to tell its story as well as giving a sort of nod to 1980s action flicks. At least, that’s what it felt like. Focussed mainly on disgraced British army officer, Jack Elliot, whose employed as a mercenary to go into Cambodia and rescue a wealthy refugee’s family from the Khmer Rouge, it also explores his daughter’s efforts to find the father she never knew was alive. While there are moments that are heartfelt and gripping (some of the scenes in Cambodia wrench your heart our of your chest) and do remind us of the horror of those times, I also found it gratuitous in parts. The villains, especially the Thai people (Jack has to enter Cambodia through Thailand and rely on a dubious set...

Read More...

Tags: ,

Comments: No Comments

The Wedding Shroud by Elisabeth Storrs

While it’s been a long time between books set in Ancient Rome, never before have I read one that focusses on Etruscan culture and, in particular, those from a region only twelve miles from the Tiber River, called Veii. This story centres on the marriage of a young Roman woman named Caecilia who, to satisfy a treaty, is married to a nobleman from Veii, the wealthy and brave Mastarna. Thrust into an unfamiliar and enemy culture, aware she’s a pawn in a political game, Caecilia is terrified of losing her Roman-ness and fights hard to maintain her roots. However, Etruscan culture and rituals, their religion and treatment of others – particularly women whom they see as equals – differs so much from what she’d been raised to believe and fear and that’s before she considers the unexpected surprise that is her older husband. Drawn into familial as well as social dramas of her new Etruscan society, Caecilia slowly learns that it’s not just Roman leaders prepared to use her for their own ends. But as time passes, she also starts to question where her loyalties actually lie… This book was absolutely fascinating. The history and detail included in the story were riveting, but never at the expense of plot. On the contrary, all the little facts about life in these times, from the way the sexes were treated, class structure, dress, meals, religious rituals, modes of address, were all interwoven expertly throughout the narrative. Likewise, the setting is beautifully rendered. You see the citadel of the Veii, the frequent parties they indulge in, the manner of their rituals, just as you can envisage the landscape and changing seasons. It’s easy to tell that Storss not only knows this part of history well, but is passionate about it too, and...

Read More...

Tags: , ,

Comments: No Comments

Fair Warning by Michael Connelly

You know when you pick up a Michael Connelly book you’re about to hugely entertained by a tight, gritty plot, intense characters, high-octane moments and a realistic setting. Fair Warning, the third book in his Jack McEvoy series, ticks all those boxes and then some. Jack is a reporter with a long-from investigative paper that usually focusses on softer issues that everyday readers find interesting. But when a woman he had a one-night stand with twelve months earlier is found brutally murdered, he’s not only pulled into the investigation, but determines to uncover the culprit. What Jack does find leaves him not only under suspicion for the crime he’s also seeking to solve, but on the brink of uncovering a serial killer who’s been on the loose for years and with a (growing) body count that makes even Jack and his associates baulk. As Jack gets closer to finding out the killer’s identity, so too the murderer is getting closer to Jack. Is breaking news worth risking your life for? Connelly has done it again with an edge of the seat read that plunges the reader into some very dark corners before hauling us out again, giving us a good ol’ shake and then setting us upon another shadowy, dangerous path. Replete with characters who always act in ways that make sense – whether it’s in relation to who they are, their personal relationships, their job, laws, rules etc (too many crime books ask readers to suspend their disbelief just a bit too much – Connelly, I find, is never guilty of that particular sin but always works within the logic of the world he evokes) – possess flaws, egos and big hearts as well as dire intentions, this is another sensational read. I read this over a couple...

Read More...

Tags: ,

Comments: No Comments

Cry of the Firebird by T.M. Clark

I have been meaning to read a T.M. Clark book for quite a while, knowing they’re set in South Africa, a place I’ve never been but remain curious about. I was finally able to do so and enjoy being immersed in a culture and land both perilous and beautiful. When Dr Lily Winters, a WHO consultant, is sent back to her beloved South Africa due to the unexpected death of an unpopular colleague, she and her famous musician husband find themselves embroiled in searching for the origins of an HIV outbreak in the San comminity of Platfontein. Despite being given appropriate medicines and care, the people are dying, leaving behind not only a trail of heartbreak, but many unanswered questions. With the help of a Kalahari policeman, Little Piet, Lily determines to discover why the disease is killing so many as well as learning why and how her colleague died. Her determination sets her on a dangerous path as there are those equally resolute she’ll remain not only ignorant about why HIV is flourishing, but unable to interfere with their very lucrative business. This is a slow-burn book that takes the reader on a journey through lush and wondrous landscapes and into unfamiliar but breathtakingly beautiful territory. The descriptions of South Africa are simply lovely and deposit you smack bang in the middle of vegetation, a lake inhabited by flamingos, or scrubland and ghettoes with ease. You smell the earthy afternoons, the crisp mornings and see the beauty of the sky as the sun rises or sets. Though I’ve seen this book described as a thriller, I wouldn’t call it that, but it is a tightly-plotted mystery, filled with characters you either loathe (because they’re so unremittingly greedy and selfish) or invest in and a place that leaps from...

Read More...

Tags: , ,

Comments: One Comment

Lockdown by Peter May

In keeping with my pandemic/apocalyptic reading, I found this one by author Peter May, whose Black House/Lewis series remain one of my all-time favourites. Apparently, May wrote Lockdown over fifteen years ago, but his publisher didn’t think anyone would credit a pandemic locking down London. I get that. Ha! Funny (not), how a few years on this is not only believable, but happening. May uses a global pandemic and a major city in lockdown as the scene for the murder of a child. London, the epicentre of the viral outbreak, is under martial law. D.I Jack MacNeil, a gruff, pragmatic Scotsman (they all seem to be in this genre!), is on his last day working for the Yard. His career and marriage are in tatters and he misses his young son who he determines to spend more time with as soon as he finishes up with the police. Tasked with finding the killer/s before they strike again, Jack not only has to track down the perpetrator, but within the next twenty-four hours, avoid getting infected. However, Jack is being watched and as he moves close to finding the killers, the virus moves closer to not only claiming him, but threatening those he loves. Can he catch a killer or just the deadly illness decimating the population? This is a cracker of a read, made more so not only because of the tight time frame in which it’s set, but also because of the frisson experienced while reading it. London is brought to a standstill on the page, but its patrolled streets are brought to eerie life for the reader as we recognise not only the empty roads and shops, the blockades and masked people, but the fear, uncertainty and the countdown to an end that is as uncertain and...

Read More...

Tags: , ,

Comments: No Comments

The Paris/Dior Secret by Natasha Lester

I hadn’t read a book by Natasha Lester before, but that mistake was rectified when I picked up The Paris Secret (also called The Dior Secret?). Now, having read her latest, I understand why people rave about her work. I also know I have more marvellous tales to lose myself in. I feel, however, I need to explain why I haven’t read her before and I think it’s to do with the covers. I’m not sure why, but to me they suggest a different content to that which lies between them. It was a content I didn’t think I’d enjoy – how wrong can you be? I LOVED this book. The adage “don’t judge a book by its cover” is one I should have heeded in this instance. But of course, we do and I judged poorly. The novel employs multiple timelines to tell the story of a group of disparate women at different stages in world history and women’s autonomy. There are the amazing women who flew planes during the war – not to fight the enemy, but to relocate them for airmen to both fly into enemy territory and deposit or pick-up resistance fighters/spies. It was incredibly dangerous and devalued work – the latter at least initially. In this part, the reader follows the lives of two sisters – Liberty and Skye – their estrangement and unconventional career paths. The men and women they encounter in their duties are brave, bold and reckless and the relationships they form are enduring and deep. Based on actual events and the history of these incredible women, I found this section riveting. The book also explores the launch of Christian Dior’s first fashion collection post-war. Bold, stylish and extravagant, it speaks to a world hurting from war and its terrible aftermath. His...

Read More...

Tags: , ,

Comments: 2

Archives

Goodreads

Karen Brooks's books on Goodreads
TallowTallow (Curse of The Bond Riders, #1)
reviews: 29
ratings: 489 (avg rating 3.79)

VotiveVotive (Curse of the Bond Rider #2)
reviews: 10
ratings: 154 (avg rating 4.25)

The Gaze of the GorgonThe Gaze of the Gorgon (Cassandra Klein, #2)
reviews: 1
ratings: 14 (avg rating 3.78)

The Kurs of AtlantisThe Kurs of Atlantis (Cassandra Klein, #4)
ratings: 15 (avg rating 4.12)

Rifts Through QuentarisRifts Through Quentaris
ratings: 12 (avg rating 3.56)