The Great Divide by L.J.M. Owen

I love L.J.M. Owen’s Elizabeth Pimm’s series, so was really looking forward to her starting what promises to be a new and even darker crime series. I am pleased to say, the result is fabulous.

The Great Divide is set in a small, rural town in Tasmania – a place fast becoming popular for crime writers across a range of media. And it’s no wonder (but maybe, as a local, I’m biased J). For readers familiar with Tassie, the setting is so authentic in many ways – from the climate, to the suspicious welcome of the townspeople, their quirkiness and infuriating familiarity with each other, to the natural surroundings. To those not so conversant with Tassie topography or towns and their folk, there’s no problem as newly-arrived, Detective Jake Hunter, becomes the lens though which this troubled place and its rather secretive inhabitants are viewed.

Believing he’s escaped an uncomfortable situation in Melbourne, giving himself professional and personal breathing space, Jake’s illusions are quickly shattered when the body of a former headmistress of a children’s home is discovered in a nearby vineyard.

What follows is a case filled with half-told truths, bigotry, lies, enigmas and a dark past that many of the townsfolk are reluctant to shed light upon. But as the death toll begins to mount, Jake understands that not only must he get the bottom of what’s going on, unearth that which too many wish to keep buried, but do it before anyone else is murdered.

This is a grim tale which ratchets up the tension with each chapter. It is moody, dark, and hard to put down. Equal parts disturbing and compelling, the pace is perfect and the characters well drawn. Jake, especially, is an interesting and beautifully flawed human being that it’s easy for the reader to relate to – he is the outsider you root for.

I have to say, Australian writers are excelling in the crime genre. There are some sensational reads out there, so many great narratives, that draw you in, hold you by the collar, shake you like there’s no tomorrow, and then release you when they’re ready. This one is no exception.

Very much looking forward to what L.J.M. Owens does next – whether it’s Dr Pimms, DI Hunter, or something else from her inventive mind.

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The Good Turn by Dervla McTiernan

The third book in the Cormac Reilly series, The Good Turn, is an absolute cracker of a read that will hold you in thrall from beginning to end. 

In this instalment, the Cormac Reilly readers are coming to know and love shares centre stage with another character, junior Garda Peter Fisher. An admirer of Cormac (who is still at terrible odds with their boss), Peter is determined to not only do the right thing, but impress. When a young girl is abducted and the boss is more focused on a drug bust that his policeman son is involved in and which will elevate them both in the force, and Cormac is tied up interviewing the parents of the abducted girl, Peter takes matters into his own hands with devastating consequences.

What follows is a career-make or break for both Peter and Cormac – the latter being unreasonably held to account for actions beyond his control. But no matter what Cormac tries to do to save both his and Peter’s professional reputations, someone is one step ahead, determined to tear him down…

Atmospheric, brilliantly plotted and with characters whose lives and hopes and dreams unfold, The Good Turn is a gripping read. The locales are also marvellously drawn, whether it’s a small town in Ireland or individual rooms in houses. You breath the air, feel the chill of snow and the fall of night as it encompasses the landscape, the crackle of a fire in a cosy room or the bitter bite of a house with no heating. The additional characters are rich and real and as their stories are revealed, they add depth to an already enthralling tale. 

I couldn’t put this book down and am so disappointed I not only finished it, but now have to wait for Dervla’s next one. If you’re looking for a great crime fiction read that will transport you, the entire series and certainly this book, are for you.

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The Great Divide by L.J.M. Owen

I love L.J.M. Owen’s Elizabeth Pimm’s series, so was really looking forward to her starting what promises to be a new and even darker crime series. I am pleased to say, the result is fabulous.

The Great Divide is set in a small, rural town in Tasmania – a place fast becoming popular for crime writers across a range of media. And it’s no wonder (but maybe, as a local, I’m biased). For readers familiar with Tassie, the setting is so authentic in many ways – from the climate, to the suspicious welcome of the townspeople, their quirkiness and infuriating familiarity with each other, to the natural surroundings. To those not so familiar with Tassie topography or towns and their folk, there’s no problem as newly-arrived, Detective Jake Hunter, becomes the lens though this troubled place and its rather secretive inhabitants are viewed.

Believing he’s escaped an uncomfortable situation in Melbourne, giving himself professional and personal breathing space, Jake’s illusions are quickly shattered when the body of a former headmistress of a children’s home is discovered in a nearby vineyard.

What follows is a case filled with half-told truths, bigotry, lies, enigmas and a dark past that many of the townsfolk are reluctant to shed light upon. But as the death toll begins to mount, Jake understands that not only must he get the bottom of what’s going on, unearth that which too many wish to keep buried, but do it before anyone else is murdered.

This is a grim tale which ratchets up the tension with each chapter. It is moody, dark, and hard to put down. Equal parts disturbing and compelling, the pace is perfect and the characters well drawn. Jake, especially, is an interesting and beautifully flawed human being that it’s easy for the reader to relate to – he is the outsider you root for.

I have to say, Australian writers are excelling in the crime genre. There are some sensational reads out there, so many great narratives, that draw you in, hold you by the collar, shake you like there’s no tomorrow, and then release you when they’re ready. This one is no exception.

Very much looking forward to what L.J.M. Owens does next – whether it’s Dr Pimms, DI Hunter, or something else from her inventive mind.

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The Night Fire by Michael Connelly

This is the third book in the Harry Bosch and Renee Ballard series and, like the other two, it’s a cracker.

Semi-retired, Harry is still keeping his finger in the investigation pie when his old mentor, John Jack Thompson, dies, leaving him with a murder book for an unsolved case. Harry calls upon Renee to see if they can crack the 20-year old death of a young man.

But, the further they delve into the case, the further aspects of Thompson’s life and character are revealed, aspects that don’t represent him in such a positive light. Conflicted, but determined to uncover the reasons the murder book was removed from archives, both Harry and Renee start to wonder, is it because Thompson wanted the case cracked or was it to ensure it never got solved?

Once again, Connelly is able to meld the lead characters’ past and present, adding richness and depth to not only Harry and Renee, and also Harry’s brother, the Lincoln lawyer (who makes an appearance), but the cases they’re working. The social and cultural scene of LA is fabulously set as are the changes that twenty years has wrought. The dialogue is smart and real and what I really love about all Connelly’s books is there is a logic to the investigation and the steps Harry and Renee take that demonstrates not only their intelligence, but the barriers they encounter and how they need to be overcome if possible. Connelly also never steers away from exposing his main protagonists’ weaknesses and flaws as much as their strengths, and we love them all the more for it.

I was shocked to find Harry admits to being almost 70 in the book. Seventy! While it’s clear Harry is struggling with the notion of retiring, I think they’ll be a revolt when Connelly eventually allows our erstwhile hero to surrender his badge (properly). I’ve no doubt when that happens (and not too soon, I hope!), it will be with a bang and not a whimper.

Another fabulous addition to a taut, gripping and great series. 

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Silver by Chris Hammer

Silver, the second novel by Chris Hammer, commences virtually where his first, Scrublands, finished. Journalist Martin Scarsden is enroute to Port Silver, the place he grew up and where, with his new partner, Mandalay Blonde and her baby boy (who have gone ahead) he hopes to start afresh. But fate has other plans. 

When an old friend is brutally murdered in the hallway of the flat Mandy was renting on the day Martin arrives in town, he understands that not only are the ghosts he thought he’d laid to rest when he left Silver all those year ago still waiting to haunt him, but fresh spectres are set to destroy the plans he hasn’t even set in motion.

In the initial stages of the murder investigation, Mandy is both key witness and suspect, so Martin determines to prove her innocence. While Mandy may have blood on her hands, all is not as it seems – not in Martin’s relationship, his past and the terrible secrets it holds, nor the town he’s avoided for so long. When another horrifying event causes a media scrum to descend upon the tiny town, Martin finds himself not only reporting the story as it unfolds, but becoming, as is his inadvertent way, very much a part of it. But will he be able to write the happy ending he so desires?

This was a much denser book than Scrublands. The plot is thicker and, as a consequence, the exploration of character is as well. This worked both for and against the novel and sometimes, the story seemed to tread water as it became burdened with telling – mainly character backgrounds, as interesting as some were – rather than showing. Still, the writing is clear, evocative even, and the way Hammer represents the media, the drive to break the news, even at the expense of those who find themselves thrust into the spotlight, the ruthless behaviours and strategies deployed, is excellent. I also like that Scarsden and Mandalay are deeply flawed humans. It makes them both frustrating and real. I enjoyed this and look forward to seeing where Hammer takes us and possibly Scarsden next. 

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